THE PART I EDITED OUT

Adriane Quinlan on why she cares so, so much.
Nov 15
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I reported the repercussions of those who were investigated, in connection with the JFK assassination, 50 years ago, for The Times-Picayune.

In the 1950s, the roller rink in the Lower 9th Ward played pop hits. But the songs were stripped of all danger and longing. They didn’t blast from a radio. They were played on an organ. A church organ.

More than 50 years later, when most of the events of his youth no longer make sense, Alvin Beauboeuf remembers the organ playing in that rink, how it would draw his mother out to come watch him skate. She loved those organ tunes, slow enough the roller skaters could keep time as they circled. “The organs kept everyone kind of calm,” Beauboeuf remembered.

Outside of the rink, nothing was calm.

His father had died when the Beauboeuf was 13. Beauboeuf tried to avoid the high-school gangs. He learned to hustle and got a job working for a guy who worked for Carlos Marcello. And somewhere along the way got mixed up in something that now makes no more sense to him than it did in those years.

It was the stuff that got him questioned, bribed and tapped as a key witness in a New Orleans investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

And what does Beauboeuf think put him in the middle of history? “It was the skating they wanted me for,” said Beauboeuf, now a freight broker living in Chalmette, a conservative man who wears a loose cotton shirt printed with illustrations of Navy vessels bombed in Pearl Harbor in 1941.

Yes, it was the skating that would land Beauboeuf a page in history. “Typical,” he said.

Read on, soldier!

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/11/50_years_after_jfk_assassinati.html

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Nov 11
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Lee and the boys were down there fishing, but Lee didn’t talk to the other kids or anything. He just seemed to want to be alone, and he just fished by himself, and the odd part of his behavior that we all thought was very strange was the way he would just let the fish die on the bank after he would catch them. Now, the other small boys would catch them and, and if there was enough for eating and everything, they would throw the others back, but not Lee. He would pull them in and jus throw them down on the river - I mean on the bank by the pond and just let them lay there, and when he got through he just walked off and left them there. Something like that is hard to understand. He didn’t catch them for eating, and he didn’t want to throw them back in. He just left them on the bank and walked off after he got tired of fishing. We couldn’t understand that at all. It showed how totally inconsiderate he was of everything. It was a good example of how he acted, and his general attitude. — Warren commission interview, Julian Evans

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Nov 06
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paranoia

paranoia

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Oct 31
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Oct 19
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(Source: bummertimes)

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fightwithknives:

It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.
Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.
You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.
This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!
This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.
Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”
I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

fightwithknives:

It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.

Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.

You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.

This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!

This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.

Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”

I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

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Oct 11
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"Sweedeedee"

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Mr. GRIFFIN. Did he have the sandwiches with him?
Mr. KNIGHT. Yes.
Mr. GRIFFIN. Do you recall whether he was carrying them in a box of some sort?
Mr. KNIGHT. No; it was in a sack.

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MR. TYLER: Well see, being an alleged or putative expert on the culture of New Orleans is a blessing as well as a curse. We’re very parochial here, and I don’t necessarily mean that as a pejorative term. Much of the information that I have acquired in the succeeding years since this assassination film that I produced has come from people outside of New Orleans who look at this case, who look at this city, with a more objective eye. - #

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My job writing about politics lets me write about art, at least today;

"Fagaly gazed at the piece for a long while. While those around him offered their interpretations — how it resembled a lobster, or a whale, or would be nicer with dripping water — Fagaly demurred.

The sculpture is different from a larger-than-life giraffe, or a blue dog or a toucan. It is not something that could be easily seen from a passing car on a public street. It requires a closer, long look. And afterward, it can haunt you.

"It’s multifaceted in its interpretations," Fagaly said. "She kind of plays with your mind."

(Read more about a Lynda Benglis sculpture, sitting in a former sewerage treatment plant in a Louisiana city for almost 30 years…)

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Oct 08
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"creating a scene"

"creating a scene"

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Oct 07
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semioticsofsloth:

YAYYY SCIENCE!

Andrew, footnoted in an article in “Science”? Who would have thunk it.

semioticsofsloth:

YAYYY SCIENCE!

Andrew, footnoted in an article in “Science”? Who would have thunk it.

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They remember also that Oswald was hurriedly “gulping” down a banana after the bus reached customs, perhaps because he believed that he could not take fruit into the United States.1200 (Marina has testified that her husband liked bananas and frequently ate them.)

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Oswald had been born in New Orleans, and on his return showed great interest in finding out what had happened to the other members of his father’s family. He visited the cemetery where his father was buried and called all the Oswalds in the telephone book. By this method he located one relative, Mrs. Hazel Oswald of Metairie, La., the widow of William Stout Oswald, his father’s brother. He visited her at her home; she gave him a picture of his father and told him that as far as she knew the rest of the family was dead. - #

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