THE PART I EDITED OUT

Adriane Quinlan on why she cares so, so much.
May 08
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Just say what you mean, I say…

Chapter 7: Abbreviations glossary

AAIA – Airport and Airway Improvement Act of 1982 AIP – Airport Improvement Program
AVMT – Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled
AC – Advisory Circular

ACCRI – Aviation Climate Change Research Initiative ACHP – Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
ADT – Average Daily Traffic
AIRFA – American Indian Religious Freedom Act of 1978 AIP – Airport Improvement Program

ALP – Airport Layout Plan
APE – Area of Potential Effect
ARFF – Airfield Rescue and Fire Fighting Facility
ASNA – Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act of 1979 ASR – Airport Surveillance Radar
ASTM – American Society for Testing and Materials AVMT – Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled
BFE – Base Flood Elevation
BMP – Best Management Practices
CAA – Clean Air Act
CBRA – Coastal Barrier Resources Act
CFS – Cubic Feet per Second
CEQ – Council on Environmental Quality

CERCLA – Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act CERCLIS – Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Information

System

CFR – Code of Federal Regulations CH– Methane
CO – Carbon Monoxide
CO
– Carbon Dioxide

CONRAC – Consolidated Rent-A-Car Facility CPE – Cost per enplanement
CSA – Combined Statistical Area
CUP – Central Utility Plant

CUP – Coastal Use Permit
CWA – Clean Water Act
CZMA – Coastal Zone Management Act
CZMP – Coastal Zone Management Program
dB – Decibel
dBA – A-Weighted Decibel
DEQ – Department of Environmental Quality
DFIRM – Digital Flood Insurance Rate Maps
DHHS – Department of Health and Human Services DNL – Day Night Average Sound Level
DOT – Department of Transportation
EA – Environmental Assessment
EDMS – Emissions and Dispersion Modeling Systems EDS – Explosive Detection System
EIS – Environmental Impact Statement

EPA – Environmental Protection Agency
EMU – Environmental Management Unit
FAA – Federal Aviation Administration
FAR – Federal Aviation Regulations
FEMA – Flood Emergency Management Agency FFE – Fixtures, Furnishings, and Equipment FHWA – Federal Highway Administration

FIRM – Flood Insurance Rate Maps
FPPA – Farmland Protection Policy Act
FTA – Federal Transit Authority
FWCA – Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act of 1980
GA – General Aviation
GAO – Government Accountability Office
GHG – Greenhouse Gases
GIS – Geographic Information System
GSE – Ground Support Equipment
HECRAS – Hydrological Engineering Centers River Analyses System HFC – Hydrofluorocarbons
HSDRRS – Hurricane and Storm Damage Risk Reduction System INM – Integrated Noise Model
IPET – Interagency Performance Evaluation Taskforce
JD – Jurisdictional Determination
LADEQ – Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality

LaDOTD – Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development LCRP – Louisiana Coastal Resources Program

LDEQ – Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality
LDWF – Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Office of Wildlife LEI – Lead Environmental Inspector
Leq(h) – Hourly Equivalent Sound Level
LiDAR – Light Detection and Ranging
LLWAS – Low Level Windshear Alert System
LNHP – Louisiana Natural Heritage Program
LPDES – Louisiana Pollutant Discharge Elimination System
LQD – Large Quantity Generator
LOS – Level of Service
LUST – Leaking Underground Storage Tank
MLD – Most Likely Descendant
MOA – Memorandum of Agreement
MOVES – Motor Vehicle Emissions Simulator
MS4 – Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System
MSA – Metropolitan Statistical Area
MSL – Mean Sea Level
MSY – Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport
NAAQS – National Ambient Air Quality Standards
NAC – Noise Abatement Criteria
NAVD 88 – North American Vertical Datum of 1988
NEPA – National Environmental Policy Act
NFIP – National Flood Insurance Program
NFPA – National Fire Protection Association
NHPA – National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 

NO– Nitrogen Dioxide
NO
x – Oxides of Nitrogen
NOAA – National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAB – New Orleans Aviation Board
NORPC – New Orleans Regional Planning Commission NPIAS – National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems
NPL – National Priority List
NMFS – National Marine Fisheries Service
NPDES – National Pollution Discharge Elimination System NPL – National Priority List
NPS – National Parks Service
NRC – National Response Center
NRCS – Natural Resources Conservation Service
NRHP – National Register of Historic Places
NRI – National Rivers Inventory
NWI – National Wetlands Inventory
OCM – Office of Coastal Management
OPA – The Oil Pollution Act of 1990
O
– Ozone
Pb – Lead
PCA – Pre-conditioned Air
PFC – Passenger Facility Charge
PFC – Perflurocarbons
PM
10 or PM2.5 – Particulate Matter
RAMPP – Risk Assessment, Mapping, and Planning Partners RCRA – Resource Conservation and Recovery Act

RFAP – Reasonably Foreseeable, On-Airport Projects
RISK MAP – Risk Mapping, Assessment, and Planning Program
RON – Remain Overnight
RS&H – Reynolds, Smith, & Hills, Inc.
RTR – Remote Transmit Receiver
SAGA – Sustainable Aviation Guidance Alliance
SDWA – Safe Drinking Water Act
SEC – Seconds
SF6 – Sulfur Hexafluoride
SFHA – Special Flood Hazard Area
SHPO – State Historic Preservation Officer
SIP – State Implementation Plan
SO
– Sulfur Dioxide
SQD – Small Quantity Generator
SSCP – Security Screening Checkpoint
TAF – Terminal Area Forecast
TCP – Traditional Cultural Properties
TIS – Traffic Impact Study
TMDL – Total Maximum Daily Load
TNM – Traffic Noise Model
TSA – Transportation Security Administration
TSCA – Toxic Substances Control Act
TSIS-CORSIM – Traffic Software Integrated System – Corridor Simulation USACE – U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
USC – United States Code

USDOT – U.S. Department of Transportation USFS – United States Forest Service USFWS – U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service VEH – Vehicle

VOC – Volatile Organic Compound WSRS – Wild and Scenic Rivers System

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Apr 28
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The people who found my phone had given me the address of where to meet them . They lived in a mansion on LePage street – one of those houses with a porch that we would always walk by and say, ‘I want to live here.’ The house was white with grey trip and windows of old glass. The people on the steps were sitting like they should have been wearing antebellum skirts. Instead, they were in shorts and shirts and one of them wore a sunhat though now the sky was dusk. They didn’t know if anyone had found a phone. They offered me a drink and when I said no, one of them offered me shots. The rest of them laughed at the man who had offered, as though to say how ridiculous he was. I wanted to comfort him. I always love fading things, out of pity. I said “shots, shots” – to say that I did want one, to the man; and to let his friends know that I thought he was ridiculous. Was I cruel? He had a large belly and moved slowly, touching the steps, the railing, and inside lingering on the furniture, as though to steady himself. He reminded me of a dream I had once of my father serving me poison.

The man disappeared into a backroom and I felt, from the way he moved, that I should stay behind. I wasn’t welcome there, in the back of the house. Some places are too private to enter: a roped-off palace, the laboratory where experiments are done. Here in the foyer, there were framed paintings of horses and a staircase leading up to darkness. The marble top of a circle table was cold to my finger. The man did not come back, not for a while – not for long enough for me to think for a while about the things I had to do and the things I had done, to think of all the notations I could no longer make on my phone – which was still missing.

Walking where he had gone, I was in a kitchen wiped-clean and lemon-scented with mirrors everywhere and windows into the blue trees. There were no people here. Voices were coming from the backyard, past a line of French doors and a set of steps down, to a crowd that had come together around a man burned meat over a pit of fire – holding it away from him, with tongs. I was afraid of the house and the people in the house in the same way that he was afraid of the fire. I kept clasping my elbows. Without my phone, I realized, I was nothing. No one there could ever see me again because they could never call me again. If a stranger came in to my apartment with a heavy knife, I could not call the police. Maybe without my phone, I had become invisible.

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Nov 15
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I reported the repercussions of those who were investigated, in connection with the JFK assassination, 50 years ago, for The Times-Picayune.

In the 1950s, the roller rink in the Lower 9th Ward played pop hits. But the songs were stripped of all danger and longing. They didn’t blast from a radio. They were played on an organ. A church organ.

More than 50 years later, when most of the events of his youth no longer make sense, Alvin Beauboeuf remembers the organ playing in that rink, how it would draw his mother out to come watch him skate. She loved those organ tunes, slow enough the roller skaters could keep time as they circled. “The organs kept everyone kind of calm,” Beauboeuf remembered.

Outside of the rink, nothing was calm.

His father had died when the Beauboeuf was 13. Beauboeuf tried to avoid the high-school gangs. He learned to hustle and got a job working for a guy who worked for Carlos Marcello. And somewhere along the way got mixed up in something that now makes no more sense to him than it did in those years.

It was the stuff that got him questioned, bribed and tapped as a key witness in a New Orleans investigation into the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

And what does Beauboeuf think put him in the middle of history? “It was the skating they wanted me for,” said Beauboeuf, now a freight broker living in Chalmette, a conservative man who wears a loose cotton shirt printed with illustrations of Navy vessels bombed in Pearl Harbor in 1941.

Yes, it was the skating that would land Beauboeuf a page in history. “Typical,” he said.

Read on, soldier!

http://www.nola.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/11/50_years_after_jfk_assassinati.html

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Nov 11
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Lee and the boys were down there fishing, but Lee didn’t talk to the other kids or anything. He just seemed to want to be alone, and he just fished by himself, and the odd part of his behavior that we all thought was very strange was the way he would just let the fish die on the bank after he would catch them. Now, the other small boys would catch them and, and if there was enough for eating and everything, they would throw the others back, but not Lee. He would pull them in and jus throw them down on the river - I mean on the bank by the pond and just let them lay there, and when he got through he just walked off and left them there. Something like that is hard to understand. He didn’t catch them for eating, and he didn’t want to throw them back in. He just left them on the bank and walked off after he got tired of fishing. We couldn’t understand that at all. It showed how totally inconsiderate he was of everything. It was a good example of how he acted, and his general attitude. — Warren commission interview, Julian Evans

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Nov 06
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paranoia

paranoia

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Oct 31
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Oct 19
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(Source: bummertimes)

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fightwithknives:

It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.
Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.
You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.
This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!
This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.
Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”
I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

fightwithknives:

It’s always fun to see a little bit of sexism in local advertising. And by “fun” and mean “overall gross and disappointing.” This is an ad I saw in the skyway today for the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management, aka the ritzy place where you can get an MBA.

Since the early 1980s, “glass ceiling” is a term used to describe employment discrimination against women and minorities, the idea that you can see people at the top but sexism and racism continually prevent you from being promoted.

You can see from the graph in the Wikipedia entry on Glass Ceiling, that this discrimination has nothing to do with education.

This ad posits that if more women get a degree in business, then there won’t be any more glass ceiling. Easy solution, ladies! Get your MBA and then you’ll be just as qualified as every man in a top position! There’s no actual discrimination, you just don’t have enough degrees from prominent business schools!

This whole idea is, of course, bullshit. Systematic discrimination exists, and it’s not because women aren’t trying hard enough to get advanced degrees. (In fact, more women than ever are getting MBAs. Whether it’s worth it is another issue.) It’s a classic instance of blaming sexism on individual accomplishments rather than a cultural prejudice for which there is pretty solid scientific proof, to say nothing of anecdotal evidence.

Why this ad is especially disappointing: it’s an ad for the University of Minnesota, my alma mater. It’s where I got my master’s degree in Mass Communication— where my skills in recognizing stupid sexist advertising were finely honed. I’d venture a guess that at least one of the agency folks who created this ad went to the U of M, and it’s sad to note that no one in Carlson’s communications department thought that “maybe this isn’t a good way to get more women to apply to our school.”

I would like to see this ad taken down because it takes a useful term for describing the concept of systematic discrimination and uses it to blame women for not being good enough at their careers, for not having enough accomplishments, and for generally being less than. It’s fucking bullshit sexism, and there’s no excuse.

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Oct 11
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"Sweedeedee"

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Mr. GRIFFIN. Did he have the sandwiches with him?
Mr. KNIGHT. Yes.
Mr. GRIFFIN. Do you recall whether he was carrying them in a box of some sort?
Mr. KNIGHT. No; it was in a sack.

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MR. TYLER: Well see, being an alleged or putative expert on the culture of New Orleans is a blessing as well as a curse. We’re very parochial here, and I don’t necessarily mean that as a pejorative term. Much of the information that I have acquired in the succeeding years since this assassination film that I produced has come from people outside of New Orleans who look at this case, who look at this city, with a more objective eye. - #

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My job writing about politics lets me write about art, at least today;

"Fagaly gazed at the piece for a long while. While those around him offered their interpretations — how it resembled a lobster, or a whale, or would be nicer with dripping water — Fagaly demurred.

The sculpture is different from a larger-than-life giraffe, or a blue dog or a toucan. It is not something that could be easily seen from a passing car on a public street. It requires a closer, long look. And afterward, it can haunt you.

"It’s multifaceted in its interpretations," Fagaly said. "She kind of plays with your mind."

(Read more about a Lynda Benglis sculpture, sitting in a former sewerage treatment plant in a Louisiana city for almost 30 years…)

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Oct 08
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"creating a scene"

"creating a scene"

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Oct 07
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semioticsofsloth:

YAYYY SCIENCE!

Andrew, footnoted in an article in “Science”? Who would have thunk it.

semioticsofsloth:

YAYYY SCIENCE!

Andrew, footnoted in an article in “Science”? Who would have thunk it.

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